Henri-Frédéric Amiel

Strange reminiscence!  At the end of the terrace of La Treille, on the eastern side, as I looked down the slope, it seemed to me that I saw once more in imagination a little path which existed there when I was a child, and ran through the bushy underwood, which was thicker then than it is now.  It is at least forty years since this impression disappeared from my mind.  The revival of an image so dead and so forgotten set me thinking.  Consciousness seems to be like a book in which the leaves turned by life successively cover and hide one another in spite of their semi-transparency; but although the book may be open at the page of the present, the wind, for a few seconds, may blow back the first pages into view. 

And at death will these leaves cease to hide one another, and shall we see all our past at once?  Is death the passage from the successive to the simultaneous – that is, from time to eternity?  Shall we then understand, in its unity, the poem or mysterious episode of our existence, which till then we have spelled out phrase by phrase?  And is this the secret of that glory which so often enfolds the countenance of the newly dead?  If so, death would be like the arrival of a traveller at the top of a great mountain, whence he sees spread out before him the whole configuration of the country, of which till then have had had but passing glimpses.  To be able to overlook one’s own history, to divine its meaning in the general concert and in the divine plan, would be the beginning of eternal happiness.  Till then we had sacrificed ourselves to the universal order, but then we should understand and appreciate the beauty of that order.  We had toiled and laboured under the conductor of the orchestra; and we should find ourselves become surprised and delighted hearers.  We had seen nothing but our own little path in the mist; and suddenly a marvellous panorama and boundless distances would open before our dazzled eyes.  Why not? 

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Patrick Kavanagh



Watch him, watch him, that man on a hill whose spirit

is a wet sack flapping about the knees of time.

He lives that his little fields may stay fertile when his own body

Is spread in the bottom of a ditch under two coulters crossed in Christ’s name....

Yet sometime when the sun comes through a gap

These men know God the Father in a tree:

The Holy Spirit is the rising sap,

And Christ will be the green leaves that will come

At Easter from the sealed and guarded tomb.


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In their many different idioms the classical spiritual writers have attempted to throw light on the eternal question of union with God. 
Every month we give you a brief passage from a spiritual classic.